Visual Arts

The visual arts at Bryn Mawr offer a faculty-guided curriculum that provides students with a treasure chest of skills and opportunities. The faculty guides students in developing greater imagination and creativity by presenting the best that the visual arts have to offer.

The Bryn Mawr School

Lower School

Lower School visual arts students work with an incredible array of materials and tools that they use in creative ways to explore, capture, and express art from life and from imagination. Tempera, crayon, marker, watercolor, and chalk give shape and color to images. Paper, clay, wood, tile, and wire are the gateways to sculpture, design, and portraits. Printmaking, etching, landscape drawing, kaleidoscope design, Pariscraft figures, Chinese brush painting, weaving, stitching, and tile design are all part of the curriculum. Throughout the year, student artwork is displayed in the Lower School and in exhibits around the campus. The All-School Art Show, which is a culmination of the year's work, is produced in early May.

Middle School

The emphasis in the visual arts classroom is on observation and rendering natural forms as well as increasing understanding of art through the study of the elements of line, color, shape, form, space, and texture. Non-Western art is studied, and the principles of design are introduced. Still-life, landscape painting, and figurative drawing are explored. Computer-generated design is introduced, giving breadth and depth to the visual arts curriculum. Displays of student artwork are mounted throughout the year at various locations on campus, and the All-School Art Show, which is a culmination of the year's work, is produced in early May.

Upper School

Visual arts coursework develops skills while engaging a student's creativity and imagination. The Art and Design series provides four levels of instruction in a variety of traditional and contemporary media. Photography is a hands-on, rather than digitally driven, curriculum. The goal is increased "visual literacy," whereby students interpret and take meaning from the images they capture and create. Ceramics courses infused with diverse cultural styles, and dynamic computer media design classes, round out a multifaceted program. Student artwork is displayed throughout the year at various locations on campus, and the All-School Art Show, which is a culmination of the year's work, is produced in early May. Each year brings a series of guest artists to campus for afternoon workshops and residencies. As educators in our Information Age, we recognize that visual literacy compliments linguistic and aural literacy in helping students communicate and thrive in a highly complex world.